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Nederlands Buitenlands   Alles  Titel  Auteur  ISBN        
Levende natuur
Biologie algemeen
Levertijd: 5 tot 11 werkdagen


Thomas D. Seeley

The Wisdom of the Hive

€ 138.35



Taal / Language : English

Inhoudsopgave:
Preface xi
PART I. INTRODUCTION 1(68)
The Issues
3(19)
The Evolution of Biological Organization
3(4)
The Honey Bee Colony as a Unit of Function
7(9)
Analytic Scheme
16(6)
The Honey Bee Colony
22(24)
Worker Anatomy and Physiology
23(5)
Worker Life History
28(3)
Nest Architecture
31(3)
The Annual Cycle of a Colony
34(2)
Communication about Food Sources
36(3)
Food Collection and Honey Production
39(7)
The Foraging Abilities of a Colony
46(23)
Exploiting Food Sources over a Vast Region around the Hive
47(3)
Surveying the Countryside for Rich Food Sources
50(2)
Responding Quickly to Valuable Discoveries
52(2)
Choosing among Food Sources
54(5)
Adjusting Selectivity in Relation to Forage Abundance
59(2)
Regulating Comb Construction
61(2)
Regulating Pollen Collection
63(2)
Regulating Water Collection
65(4)
Summary
66(3)
PART II. EXPERIMENTAL ANALYSIS 69(168)
Methods and Equipment
71(13)
The Observation Hive
71(3)
The Hut for the Observation Hive
74(1)
The Bees
75(2)
Sugar Water Feeders
77(2)
Labeling Bees
79(2)
Measuring the Total Number of Bees Visiting a Feeder
81(1)
Observing Bees of Known Age
81(1)
Recording the Behavior of Bees in the Hive
81(1)
The Scale Hive
82(1)
Censusing a Colony
83(1)
Allocation of Labor among Forage Sites
84(71)
How a Colony Acquires Information about Food Sources
85(1)
Which Bees Gather the Information?
85(3)
Which Information Is Shared?
88(1)
Where Information Is Shared inside the Hive
88(2)
The Coding of Information about Profitability
90(4)
The Bees` Criterion of Profitability
94(4)
The Relationship Between Nectar-Source Profitability and Waggle Dance Duration
98(4)
The Adaptive Tuning of Dance Thresholds
102(11)
How a Forager Determines the Profitability of a Nectar Source
113(9)
Summary
119(3)
How a Colony Acts on Information about Food Sources
122(1)
Employed Foragers versus Unemployed Foragers
122(2)
How Unemployed Foragers Read the Information on the Dance Floor
124(8)
How Employed Foragers Respond to Information about Food-Source Profitability
132(2)
The Correct Distribution of Foragers among Nectar Sources
134(8)
Cross Inhibition between Forager Groups
142(3)
The Pattern and Effectiveness of Forager Allocation among Nectar Sources
145(10)
Summary
151(4)
Coordination of Nectar Collecting and Nectar Processing
155(22)
How a Colony Adjusts Its Collecting Rate with Respect to the External Nectar Supply
156(1)
Rapid Increase in the Number of Nectar Foragers via the Waggle Dance
156(2)
Increase in the Number of Bees Committed to Foraging via the Shaking Signal
158(4)
How a Colony Adjusts Its Processing Rate with Respect to Its Collecting Rate
162(1)
Rapid Increase in the Number of Nectar Processors via the Tremble Dance
162(11)
Which Bees Become Additional Food Storers?
173(4)
Summary
174(3)
Regulation of Comb Construction
177(16)
Which Bees Build Comb?
177(4)
How Comb Builders Know When to Build Comb
181(6)
How the Quantity of Empty Comb Affects Nectar Foraging
187(6)
Summary
191(2)
Regulation of Pollen Collection
193(19)
The Inverse Relationship between Pollen Collection and the Pollen Reserve
194(1)
How Pollen Foragers Adjust Their Colony`s Rate of Pollen Collection
195(3)
How Pollen Foragers Receive Feedback from the Pollen Reserves
198(3)
The Mechanism of Indirect Feedback
201(3)
Why the Feedback Flows Indirectly
204(3)
How a Colony`s Foragers Are Allocated between Pollen and Nectar Collection
207(5)
Summary
209(3)
Regulation of Water Collection
212(25)
The Importance of Variable Demand
213(2)
Patterns of Water and Nectar Collection during Hive Overheating
215(3)
Which Bees Collect Water?
218(2)
What Stimulates Bees to Begin Collecting Water?
220(1)
What Tells Water Collectors to Continue or Stop Their Activity?
221(5)
Why Does a Water Collector`s Unloading Experience Change When Her Colony`s Need for Water Changes?
226(11)
Summary
234(3)
PART III. OVERVIEW 237(32)
The Main Features of Colony Organization
239(24)
Division of Labor Based on Temporary Specializations
240(4)
Absence of Physical Connections between Workers
244(3)
Diverse Pathways of Information Flow
247(5)
High Economy of Communication
252(3)
Numerous Mechanisms of Negative Feedback
255(3)
Coordination without Central Planning
258(5)
Enduring Lessons from the Hive
263(6)
Glossary 269(8)
Bibliography 277(14)
Index 291
Extra informatie: 
Hardback
318 pagina's
Januari 1996
862 gram
248 x 216 x 25 mm
Harvard University Press us


Levertijd: 5 tot 11 werkdagen