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Nederlands Buitenlands   Alles  Titel  Auteur  ISBN        
Taal
Taal en cultuur algemeen
Britta Korth Language Attitudes Towards Kyrgyz and Russian
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Britta Korth

Language Attitudes Towards Kyrgyz and Russian

€ 61.55


Language contact between Russian and Kyrgyz speakers in the Kyrgyz Soviet Socialist Republic and in present day Kyrgyzstan has historically been a source of conflict. With independence, the young state began its search for a new identity in which language played a crucial role. Communicative and symbolic necessities therefore had to be considered in the formulation of an adequate language policy. This book describes the sociolinguistic processes in independent Kyrgyzstan from an ethno-linguistic perspective and gives an overview of language policy in both the Soviet Union and independent Kyrgyzstan. Drawing on 25 in-depth interviews and observations conducted during two years of fieldwork in Kyrgyzstan, the author explains why, in contrast to the status of titular languages in other former Soviet republics, the Kyrgyz language in Kyrgyzstan is still dominated by Russian after more than a decade of independence.





Taal / Language : English

Inhoudsopgave:
1. Introduction 1
2. Language, State and the Individual 5
2.1. Multilingualism and Society
6
2.1.1. Types of Bi- and Multilingual Societies
6
2.1.2. Language and Dominance
9
2.1.3. Language Shift and Language Maintenance
13
2.2. Language and the Nation
14
2.2.1. Language as a Symbol and a Means of Communication
15
2.2.2. Language Policy
19
2.3. Language and Identity
23
2.3.1. Language Attitudes, Motivation and Stereotypes
23
2.3.2. Linguistic Identity
27
2.3.3. Concepts of Mother Tongue
29
2.4. Language and Education
31
2.4.1. Language Education and Attitude
31
2.4.2. `Mother Tongue` Instruction
34
2.4.3. Language Choice in Education
35
3. Methodology 39
3.1. Field Research and Progressive Focusing
39
3.1.1. Qualitative Research
41
3.1.2. Experiment vs. Discursive Approach
42
3.2. Data Collection and Analysis
45
3.2.1. Interviews: Language Biographies
45
3.2.1.1. Selection of Informants
46
3.2.1.2. Interview Setting
48
3.2.1.3. Transcription and Analysis
50
3.2.2. Other Interviews
53
3.2.2.1. Specialized Interviews
53
3.2.2.2. Group Interviews
54
3.2.3. Observation
55
3.2.3.1. Participant Observation
55
3.2.3.2. Focused Observation
56
4. History of Language and Education Politics on Kyrgyzstan`s Territory 61
4.1. Russians and Non-Russians before Soviet Rule
62
4.1.1. First Contact
62
4.1.2. Russian- and Other-ness
65
4.1.3. Education of Russians and Non-Russians
66
4.2. Language and Education Policies in the Soviet Union
69
4.2.1. Leninist Concepts of Nationality and Language
70
4.2.2. Soviet Sociolinguistics
74
4.2.3. Soviet Language Politics
77
4.2.3.1. Language Construction ( ) in the 1920`s
77
4.2.3.2. Cyrillization and the Praise of Russian
81
4.2.3.3. Russian as the `Second Mother Tongue`
85
4.2.4. Education and Language in the USSR
88
4.2.4.1. Educational Aims
89
4.2.4.2. Language of Instruction
92
4.2.4.3. Teaching of Russian
97
4.2.4.4. Teaching of Kyrgyz
102
4.2.5. Language and Education Policy during and after Perestroika
103
4.2.6. Bilingualism in the USSR
106
4.2.5.1. The Soviet Concept of Bilingualism
107
4.2.5.2. Bilingualism in Soviet Censuses and Surveys
110
4.3. Language Policy and Education in the Republic of Kyrgyzstan
116
4.3.1. Language Policy in Independent Kyrgyzstan
116
4.3.1.1. Status Planning
117
4.3.1.2. Language Competence and Use
125
4.3.1.3. Corpus Planning
128
4.3.2. Education and Language
131
4.3.2.1. Language of Instruction
132
4.3.2.2. Language Teaching in Kyrgyzstan
133
5. Language Attitudes and `Linguistic Identity in the Kyrgyz Republic 137
5.1. Attitudes towards Russian
138
5.1.1. Superiority of Russian
138
5.1.1.1. Structural Superiority
138
5.1.1.2. Functional Superiority
140
5.1.1.3. Superiority of Russian Speakers
143
5.1.2. Negative Attitudes towards Russian
147
5.2. Attitudes towards Kyrgyz
152
5.2.1. Pride for Speaking Kyrgyz
153
5.2.2. Shame for Not Speaking Kyrgyz
155
5.2.3. Respect and Offence
158
5.2.4. Negative Attitudes towards Kyrgyz
161
5.3. Attitudes towards Code-switching
165
5.3.1. Code-switching as Linguistic Deformation
166
5.3.2. Code-switching as an Expressive Means
170
5.4. Language, Ethnicity and Citizenship
172
5.4.1. The Concept of Native Language ( )
173
5.4.2. Language and Group Belonging
176
5.4.2.1. Ethnic Belonging
176
5.4.2.2. State Belonging
180
5.4.2.3. State Language
183
5.5. Motivation for Language Learning
186
5.5.1. Economic Motivation
186
5.5.2. Access to Information
190
5.5.3. Integration
192
5.6. Summary of Chapter 5
195
6. Language and Education 199
6.1. Language of Instruction Division into Language Groups
200
6.1.1. Language Competence and Language of Instruction
200
6.1.2. Language and Educational Achievement
204
6.1.3. Submersion into Russian
210
6.1.4. Immersion into Kyrgyz
213
6.1.5. Summary of Chapter 6.1.
215
6.2. Traditional Methods of Language Teaching
220
6.2.1. Retelling and Reading
221
6.2.2. Memorization and Script-like Interaction
223
6.2.3 `Speaking and Knowing` a Language
227
6.3. The Problems of Teaching Kyrgyz
230
6.3.1. Teaching Content
230
6.3.2. Teaching Style and Culture of Communication
234
6.3.3. Ethnicity as a Marker of Language Competence
237
6.4. The Problems of Teaching Russian
239
7. Conclusion 241
Annex
Transcript and Translation of an Interview Taken in October 2001
247
Literature 297
Extra informatie: 
Paperback / softback
322 pagina's
Januari 2005
514 gram
226 x 154 x 22 mm
Verlag Peter Lang de


Levertijd: 5 tot 11 werkdagen